The Cereal Box

Who would have thought that in a kitchen in a house in Portmore, Jamaica, you’d find Hebrew letters? I remember the first time I saw them;  I asked my aunt the name of the cereal she’d bought, but she didn’t remember or else didn’t want to spend the time thinking about it. But then, a few days ago, she bought it again. And this time, I borrowed my brother’s camera so I could take pictures:

You may be wondering where the Hebrew is; the most obvious languages are English and Spanish. But right beside the cereal mascot’s ear, so small that you could eat this cereal every day for years and never notice it,  there it is:

כשר

It’s the Hebrew word כשר, kasher, which we know in English as ‘kosher’. I’m guessing the “V” has something to do with “pareve”:

Parve is a Hebrew term (pareve is the Yiddish term) that describes food without any meat or dairy ingredients.

Jewish dietary laws considers pareve food to be neutral; Pareve food can be eaten with both meat and milk dishes.

Fish, eggs, fruits and vegetables are parve.
http://kosherfood.about.com

Any time I see a random Hebrew word is a happy time for me. 🙂 So, I learnt a new word: parve, פַּרְוֶה. All because of a cereal box my aunt happened to bring in the house ’cause it’s cheaper that Frosted Flakes. (I prefer Frosted Flakes, though… but that’s cool for now.) ^_^

~Ken

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5 Responses to The Cereal Box

  1. read.robin says:

    Haha, dork. 😛 I know the feeling, though. Whenever I see a random Korean word, I kind of do a happy dance inside. 🙂

    Like

  2. Michal says:

    The OV is the particular organization that certified that cereal kosher. Different areas have their own and there are also national organizations. Some people will only use certain orgs because they trust that organizations level of strictness.
    Love that you found that!

    Like

  3. Yaelle says:

    That’s a real cool story! =)
    Just wanna add that “parve” has penetrated seculars’ everyday language with the meaning of “neither here not there” or “neutral”. Examples:

    A: How was your date last night?
    B: Ok, the guy was nice but nothing more. The parve type.

    Or:
    The new movie suites all crowds as it is a bit of a parve, I wish the director would have been more daring.

    Like

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